Commit 65ac5cc0 authored by Leonard Guetta's avatar Leonard Guetta
Browse files

idem

parent 7fa53720
......@@ -242,9 +242,9 @@ for the category of (strict) $\oo$\nbd{}categories.
% In particular, this would imply that every $\oo$\nbd{}category is
% homologically coherent, which, as we have already seen, is not true.
In other words, if we think of $\oo\Cat$ as a model of homotopy types (via the
localization by the Thomason equivalences), then polygraphic homology is
localization by the Thomason equivalences), then the polygraphic homology is
\emph{not} a well-defined invariant. Another point of view would be to
consider that polygraphic homology is an intrinsic invariant of
consider that the polygraphic homology is an intrinsic invariant of
$\oo$\nbd{}categories (and not up to Thomason equivalence) and in that way is
finer than singular homology. This is not the point of view adopted here, and
the reason will be motivated at the end of this introduction. The slogan to
......
......@@ -152,7 +152,7 @@ $\mathbf{Str}\oo\Cat$ la catégorie des $\oo$\nbd{}catégories (strictes).
Par ailleurs, la catégorie $\oo\Cat$ peut être munie d'une structure de
catégorie de modèles, communément appelée \emph{la structure de catégorie de modèles folk}
\cite{lafont2010folk}, dont les équivalences faibles sont les
\emph{équivalences de $\oo$\nbd{}catégories} (notion généralisant celle des équivalences de
\emph{équivalences de $\oo$\nbd{}catégories} (notion généralisant celle d'équivalence de
catégories) et dont les objets cofibrants sont les $\oo$\nbd{}catégories
libres \cite{metayer2008cofibrant}. Les résolutions polygraphiques ne sont alors
rien d'autre que des remplacements cofibrants pour cette structure de catégorie de modèles.
......@@ -219,8 +219,7 @@ $\mathbf{Str}\oo\Cat$ la catégorie des $\oo$\nbd{}catégories (strictes).
\[
\pi_C : \sH^{\sing}(C) \to \sH^{\pol}(C),
\]
que nous appellerons le \emph{morphisme de comparaison canonique}. De plus,
une $\oo$\nbd{}catégorie $C$ est qualifiée d'\emph{homologiquement cohérente} si $\pi_C$ est
que nous appellerons le \emph{morphisme de comparaison canonique}. Une $\oo$\nbd{}catégorie $C$ est qualifiée d'\emph{homologiquement cohérente} si $\pi_C$ est
un isomorphisme (ce qui signifie exactement que le
morphisme induit $H^{\sing}_k(C) \to
H_k^{\pol}(C)$ est un isomorphisme pour tout $k \geq 0$). La question devient alors :
......@@ -253,7 +252,7 @@ $\mathbf{Str}\oo\Cat$ la catégorie des $\oo$\nbd{}catégories (strictes).
L'homologie polygraphique est un moyen de calculer les groupes d'homologie
singulière des $\oo$\nbd{}catégories homologiquement cohérentes.
\end{center}
L'idée étant que pour une $\oo$\nbd{}catégorie libre $P$ (et qui est donc sa propre résolution polygraphique), le complexe de chaînes
L'idée étant que pour une $\oo$\nbd{}catégorie libre $P$ (qui est donc sa propre résolution polygraphique), le complexe de chaînes
$\lambda(P)$ est beaucoup moins \og gros \fg{} que le
complexe de chaînes associé au nerf de $P$, et ainsi les groupes d'homologie
polygraphique de $P$ sont beaucoup plus faciles à calculer que les groupes
......@@ -341,7 +340,7 @@ $\mathbf{Str}\oo\Cat$ la catégorie des $\oo$\nbd{}catégories (strictes).
rencontrée plus haut (c'est-à-dire le monoïde commutatif $(\mathbb{N},+)$ vu
comme une $2$\nbd{}catégorie). Comme dit précédemment, cette
$2$\nbd{}catégorie n'est pas homologiquement cohérente et cela ne semble pas
être une coïncidence. Il est tout à fait remarquable que de toutes les nombreuses $2$\nbd{}catégories étudiées dans cette thèse, les seules qui ne
être une coïncidence. Il est tout à fait remarquable que de toutes les $2$\nbd{}catégories étudiées dans cette thèse, les seules qui ne
sont pas homologiquement cohérentes sont exactement celles qui ne sont
\emph{pas} sans bulles. Cela conduit à la conjecture ci-dessous, qui est le
point d'orgue de la thèse.
......@@ -387,7 +386,7 @@ $\mathbf{Str}\oo\Cat$ la catégorie des $\oo$\nbd{}catégories (strictes).
que $\oo$\nbd{}catégories faibles, prendre une \og résolution polygraphique
faible \fg{} d'une $\oo$\nbd{}catégorie libre ne revient pas à
prendre une résolution polygraphique. De fait, lorsqu'on essaye de calculer
l'homologie polygraphique de $B$, il semblerait que cela donne les groupes
l'homologie polygraphique faible de $B$, il semblerait que cela donne les groupes
d'homologie d'un $K(\mathbb{Z},2)$, ce qui aurait été attendu de l'homologie
polygraphique au départ. De cette observation, il est tentant de faire la
conjecture suivante :
......
No preview for this file type
......@@ -416,7 +416,7 @@ We can now state the promised result, whose proof can be found in \cite[Section
We often refer to the elements of the $n$\nbd{}basis of a free $\oo$\nbd{}category as the \emph{generating $n$\nbd{}cells}. This sometimes leads to use the alternative terminology \emph{set of generating $n$\nbd{}cells} instead of \emph{$n$\nbd{}basis}.
\end{paragr}
\begin{definition}\label{def:rigidmorphism}
Let $X$ and $Y$ be two free $\oo$\nbd{}categories. An $\oo$\nbd{}functor $f : X \to Y$ is \emph{rigid} if for every $n\geq 0$ and every generating $n$\nbd{}cell $x$ of $X$, $f(x)$ is a generating $n$\nbd{}cell of $Y$.
Let $C$ and $D$ be two free $\oo$\nbd{}categories. An $\oo$\nbd{}functor $f : C \to D$ is \emph{rigid} if for every $n\geq 0$ and every generating $n$\nbd{}cell $x$ of $C$, $f(x)$ is a generating $n$\nbd{}cell of $D$.
\end{definition}
So far, we have not yet seen examples of free $\oo$\nbd{}categories. In order to
do so, we will explain in a further section a recursive way of constructing free
......@@ -433,9 +433,9 @@ $\oo$\nbd{}categories; but let us first take a little detour.
\end{itemize}
It is sometimes useful to extend the above construction to the case $n=0$ by saying that $B^0M$ is the underlying set of the monoid $M$.
For $n=1$, $B^1M$ is nothing but the monoid $M$ seen as $1$-category with one object.
For $n=1$, $B^1M$ is nothing but the monoid $M$ seen as a $1$\nbd{}category with one object.
For $n>1$, while it is clear that all first three axioms of $n$\nbd{}category (units, functoriality of units and associativity) hold, it is not always true that the exchange rule is satisfied. If $\ast$ denotes the composition law of the monoid, this axiom states that for all $a,b,c,d \in M$, we must have
For $n>1$, while it is clear that all first three axioms for $n$\nbd{}categories (units, functoriality of units and associativity) hold, it is not always true that the exchange rule is satisfied. If $\ast$ denotes the composition law of the monoid, this axiom states that for all $a,b,c,d \in M$, we must have
\[
(a \ast b) \ast (c \ast d) = (a \ast c ) \ast (b \ast d).
\]
......@@ -515,7 +515,8 @@ This construction will turn out to be of great use many times in this dissertati
The characterization of the image is immediate once noted that the requirements are only the reformulation of the axioms of $n$\nbd{}functors in this particular case.
\end{proof}
\begin{lemma}\label{lemma:freencattomonoid}
Let $C$ be an $n$\nbd{}category with $n \geq 1$ and $M$ a monoid (commutative if $n>1$). If $C$ has $n$\nbd{}basis $E$, then the map
Let $C$ be an $n$\nbd{}category with $n \geq 1$ and $M$ a monoid (commutative
if $n>1$). If $C$ has an $n$\nbd{}basis $E$, then the map
\begin{align*}
\Hom_{n\Cat}(C,B^nM) &\to \Hom_{\Set}(E,M)\\
F &\mapsto F_n\vert_{E}
......@@ -523,7 +524,7 @@ This construction will turn out to be of great use many times in this dissertati
is bijective.
\end{lemma}
\begin{proof}
This is an immediate consequence of the universal property of an $n$\nbd{}basis (as explained in Paragraph \ref{paragr:defnbasisdetailed})
This is an immediate consequence of the universal property of $n$\nbd{}bases (as explained in Paragraph \ref{paragr:defnbasisdetailed})
\end{proof}
We can now prove the important proposition below.
\begin{proposition}\label{prop:countingfunction}
......@@ -765,11 +766,10 @@ We can now prove the following proposition, which is the key result of this sect
Conversely, every free $\oo$\nbd{}category and every rigid $\oo$\nbd{}functor arise this way.
\end{proposition}
\begin{proof}
From the first part Proposition \ref{prop:fromcexttocat} we know that every
$(\E^{(n)})^*$ has an $(n+1)$\nbd{}basis, which is canonically isomorphic to
From Proposition \ref{prop:fromcexttocat}, we know that each $(\E^{(n)})^*$ has an $(n+1)$\nbd{}basis, which is canonically isomorphic to
the set of indeterminates of $\E^{(n)}$. Besides, since for every $n\geq 0$,
$\E^{(n)}$ is a cellular extension of $(\E^{(n-1)})^*$, we have
$\sk_{n-1}((\E^{(n)})^*)=(\E^{(n-1)})^*$ by definition. Hence, by a straightforward induction, each $\E^{(n)}$ is a free $(n+1)$\nbd{}category and its $k$\nbd{}basis for $0 \leq k \leq n+1$ is (canonically isomorphic to) the set of indeterminates of $\E^{(k-1)}$.
\[\sk_{n-1}((\E^{(n)})^*)=(\E^{(n-1)})^*\] by definition. Hence, by a straightforward induction, each $\E^{(n)}$ is a free $(n+1)$\nbd{}category and its $k$\nbd{}basis for $0 \leq k \leq n+1$ is (canonically isomorphic to) the set of indeterminates of $\E^{(k-1)}$.
Now let $C :=\colim_{n \geq -1}(\E^{(n)})^*$. Since for every $k\geq 0$, $\sk_k$ preserves colimits and since $\sk_k((\E^{(n)})^*)=(\E^{(k-1)})^*$ for all $0\leq k <n$, we have that
\[
\sk_k(C)=(\E^{(k-1)})^*
......@@ -870,8 +870,7 @@ Recall that an $n$\nbd{}category is a particular case of $n$\nbd{}magma.
The \emph{size} of a well-formed word $w$, denoted by $\vert w \vert$, is the number of symbols $\fcomp_k$ for any $0 \leq k \leq n$ that appear in $w$.
\end{definition}
\begin{paragr}
Let $\E=(C,\Sigma,\sigma,\tau)$ be an $n$\nbd{}cellular extension. Let us
write $\E^{+}$ for the $(n+1)$\nbd{}magma defined in the following fashion:
Let $\E$ be an $n$\nbd{}cellular extension and let us write $\E^{+}$ for the $(n+1)$\nbd{}magma defined in the following fashion:
\begin{itemize}[label=-]
\item for every $0 \leq k \leq n$, we have $(\E^+)_k:=C_k$; the source, target, compositions of $k$\nbd{}cells for $0 < k \leq n$ and units on $k$\nbd{}cells for $0 \leq k <n$ are those of $C$,
\item $(\E^{+})_{n+1}=\T[\E]$,
......@@ -885,7 +884,8 @@ The \emph{size} of a well-formed word $w$, denoted by $\vert w \vert$, is the nu
(w\fcomp_k w').
\]
\end{itemize}
Hence, by definition, $\E^+$ satisfy all the axioms of $\oo$\nbd{}categories up to dimension $n$. On the other hand, the $(n+1)$\nbd{}cells of $\E^+$ make it as far as possible from being a $(n+1)$\nbd{}category as \emph{none} of the axioms of $\oo$\nbd{}categories are satisfied for cells of dimension $n+1$.
By definition, $\E^+$ satisfy all the axioms for $\oo$\nbd{}categories up to
dimension $n$. But on the other hand, the $(n+1)$\nbd{}cells of $\E^+$ make it as far as possible from being an ${(n+1)}$\nbd{}category as \emph{none} of the axioms of $\oo$\nbd{}categories are satisfied for cells of dimension $n+1$.
\end{paragr}
%We would like now to quotient the set of $(n+1)$\nbd{}cells of $\E^+$ as to make it an $(n+1)$\nbd{}category. In order to do that, we introduce the notion of congruence.
\begin{remark}\label{remark:formalunformal}
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment